Ask the Experts: 6 Questions With Mate Dyekiss, SEO Strategist

http://www.internetmarketinginc.com/blog/ask-experts-mate-dyekiss-seo-strategist/

For our debut installment of “Ask the Experts,” we dive deep into the world of SEO with one of IMI’s leading SEO Strategists, Mate Dyekiss. Mate has years of digital experience helping craft SEO strategies for enterprise-level clients. His work …

The post Ask the Experts: 6 Questions With Mate Dyekiss, SEO Strategist appeared first on Internet Marketing Inc.

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Book in a Box Passes $11.3m in Revenue, 500+ Authors

http://nathanlatka.com/thetop790/

In Episode #790, Nathan interviews JT McCormick. He’s an American businessman, author and speaker. Most recently, he served as President of Technology company HeadSpring before his current role as president & CEO at Book in a Box.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – Cyrus the Great
  • What CEO do you follow? – Jeff Bezos
  • Favorite online tool? — Slack
  • How many hours of sleep do you get?— 4.5
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – It’s not about the high school diploma. It’s about the work ethic and the sacrifice you’re willing to put in to achieve greatness

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:47 – Nathan introduces JT to the show
  • 02:08 – It is possible to buy a bestseller from Book in a Box
    • 02:23 – The cost will depend on many factors
  • 02:40 – One of Nathan’s friends spent almost $250K on Book in a Box because he wanted to put out a book and increase his speaking fee
    • 03:15 – There are many people who paid more than $250K to get a book out
  • 03:21 – Nathan read his friend’s book and thought it was trash, but his friend’s speaking fee increased
    • 03:33 – It’s still a positive ROI
  • 04:02 – Book in a Box specializes in ensuring the books are filled with valuable and meaningful content
  • 05:11 – Book in a Box has made it possible for authors to publish their book
  • 05:27 – JT just met a professional speaker who has been in the business for 22 years, but never had a book
    • 05:34 – He never got the time to write a book
    • 05:41 – Book in a Box will just interview him and write the book for him
    • 05:52 – “Your book written in your tone, your voice”
  • 06:09 – Nathan shares how Book in a Box makes you spill the beans
  • 06:41 – Cost is $25K which is $5K a month for five months
  • 06:58 – The quality of the books are the same as the ones from Barnes and Noble
  • 07:13 – Nathan got a deal from Portfolio Random House
  • 07:37 – Book in a Box provides proposals and manuscripts for their clients to bring to publishing houses
  • 08:00 – Book in a Box has worked with a total of 500 authors
  • 08:31 – Book in a Box launched in 2015
  • 09:00 – Book in a Box is one of the unicorn companies in the startup world
  • 09:13 – “We, as Book in a Box, have no debt, no private equity, no VC money and we are extremely profitable”
  • 09:27 – Book in a Box has changed pricing a couple of times
    • 09:38 – When JT met Tucker and Zach, the co-founders, he was actually looking for someone to write his book
    • 10:14 – Tucker offered JT three pricing models, $10K, $18K and $30K and JT chose the latter because he wanted a high-quality book
    • 10:51 – JT explained how the pricing turned out to be just one pricing model which is $25K
  • 11:33 – Total revenue since 2015 is $11.3M
  • 12:07 – Book in a Box currently averages 25-30 books a month which has continuously grown to 50-75 a month
  • 12:29 – Team size is 30 full-timers with over 100 freelancers
  • 13:13 – “We’re a relationship company”
  • 14:17 – Book in a Box treats their freelancers with respect and pays them on time
  • 15:05 – Book in a Box helps with marketing and book sales
    • 15:14 – Customers go to Book in a Box for one of three reasons; credibility, thought leadership or lead generation
    • 15:48 – Book in a Box created Thought Leader Media
      • 16:01 – Pricing starts at $15K to up to $75K yearly
      • 16:17 – The pricing varies depending on the author needs
      • 16:51 – Thought Leader Media just rolled out in Q1
      • 16:58 – 35 out of 250 published books are in Thought Leader Media
    • 17:10 – Total book sales from Book in a Box authors
    • 18:50 – The Famous Five

3 Key Points:

  1. Those who want to have a book written, but can’t manage to start can simply utilize companies such as Book in a Box.
  2. Pricing is crucial in every business—it’s either you make it big or lose everything.
  3. Respect and an excellent work ethic are keys to success.

Resources Mentioned:

  • Simplero – The easiest way to launch your own membership course like the big influencers do but at 1/10th the cost.
  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • GetLatka – Database of all B2B SaaS companies who have been on my show including their revenue, CAC, churn, ARPU and more
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Hotjar – Nathan uses Hotjar to track what you’re doing on this site. He gets a video of each user visit like where they clicked and scrolled to make the site a better experience
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

The post Book in a Box Passes $11.3m in Revenue, 500+ Authors appeared first on Nathan Latka.

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Bing Ads Rolls Out Account Level Ad Extensions by @MattGSouthern

http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/6866825

Bing Ads will now allow advertisers to set ad extensions for all campaigns at the account level.

The post Bing Ads Rolls Out Account Level Ad Extensions by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Crypto: With $50k MRR, He’s Buildling Crypto Database To Track Accuracy

http://nathanlatka.com/thetop782/

In Episode #782, Nathan interviews Bruce Pon. He’s the CEO and founder of BigchainDB and he’s been playing in the crypto world.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – Mungerisms by Charlie Munger
  • What CEO do you follow? – Vitalik Buterin
  • Favorite online tool? — Streak CRM
  • How many hours of sleep do you get?— At least 8
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “Buy bitcoin earlier”

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 02:03 – Nathan introduces Bruce to the show
  • 02:44 – Bruce built BigchainDB to manage data
  • 02:55 – Bitcoin is a payments cryptocurrency in a global network while Ethereum is a business logic in a global network
  • 03:11 – People pass trusted data over the blockchain network for enterprise use cases and consumer applications
    • 03:32 – From the business logic, you can exchange bitcoin and other types of value
  • 03:42 – The problem with the use case on top of the bitcoin blockchain 3 years ago was it didn’t scale
  • 04:04 – Bruce was building io which is putting intellectual property into the blockchain
    • 04:25 – You can sell your intellectual property over the network
    • 04:48 – It was built over the bitcoin blockchain and got difficult to develop over time
    • 04:54 – Ascribe.io needed meta data about the creative work, author and licensing model
    • 05:04 – Ascribe.io isn’t just built for bitcoin—it’s like trying to using a Lamborghini to move your house
    • 05:49 – Ascribe.io had AI, scientists and other PhDs who told them that building Ascribe.io wasn’t worth it
  • 06:09 – Team size is around 20 and is based in Berlin
  • 06:24 – BigchainDB has raised $6M in price round series A
  • 06:41 – Open source software is traditionally a dual license model
  • 06:53 – BigchainDB is looking at an enterprise model
    • 07:00 – They’re looking into the ICO craze too
  • 07:21 – BigchainDB is like a SaaS model
    • 07:27 – They’re looking at per transaction charges but it may not work for the long-run
  • 07:54 – BigchainDB just released their 1.0
    • 08:08 – They give premium support
  • 08:27 – Bruce is looking into 5-6 figures per month for their starting price point
  • 08:58 – One-third of the work in businesses happen in the back office
  • 09:13 – Blockchain allows you to have a single source of truth
  • 09:29 – BigchainDB unlocks the opportunity for different organizations to have a single source of truth
  • 09:48 – When you can make IoT, AI and blockchain tools, you can track the product from the inception until it gets to the customer’s hand
    • 10:01 – The customer will now understand how the product is made
    • 10:03 – The regulators will know that the product followed the guideline
    • 10:07 – The company will know if there’s a recall or quality issue and they will know where exactly the product is
  • 10:40 – BigchainDB can work with different kinds of products
  • 11:20 – Blockchain is definitely auditable
    • 11:30 – Before the product comes to you, it will be signed by entities with a cryptographic key in every process
    • 12:00 – With AI, you can also see who is in the very process of making your product
  • 12:34 – The key metric Bruce is measuring is the number of people that are building upon them
  • 12:56 – Target MRR is $100K by end of 2017
  • 13:03 – BigchainDB is currently at $50-60K MRR
  • 13:19 – Number of customers
  • 13:44 – There are 300 developers in BigchainDB’s channels and there are 5K clones of their software
  • 13:54 – BigchainDB has 1K monthly downloads of their whitepaper
  • 14:45 – The ratio of developer to clone is the 300 developers to 5K clone requests
  • 16:05 – The Famous Five

3 Key Points:

  1. Data that is passed over the blockchain network can be used for enterprise use case and consumer applications.
  2. The beauty of blockchain is that it is auditable and has accountability capabilities.
  3. Some tools that are built over the bitcoin network won’t always work; even if you have the best people in the industry.

Resources Mentioned:

  • Simplero – The easiest way to launch your own membership course like the big influencers do but at 1/10th the cost.
  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • GetLatka – Database of all B2B SaaS companies who have been on my show including their revenue, CAC, churn, ARPU and more
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Hotjar – Nathan uses Hotjar to track what you’re doing on this site. He gets a video of each user visit like where they clicked and scrolled to make the site a better experience
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

The post Crypto: With $50k MRR, He’s Buildling Crypto Database To Track Accuracy appeared first on Nathan Latka.

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How to create a kickass link-building strategy for local SEO

https://searchenginewatch.com/2017/09/20/how-to-create-a-kickass-link-building-strategy-for-local-seo/

Link-building is a tried and tested SEO tactic, and although there are a number of dubious ways to go about it, at base developing a strong link-building strategy is a smart and very necessary way to get your site ranked above your competitors.

This is particularly true of local SEO, where a few savvy tactics for building links and relationships with other local businesses can give you a huge visibility boost in local search.

According to the 2017 Local Search Ranking Factors, inbound links are the most important ranking signal.

But if you’ve run through all the usual methods of getting inbound links, what can you do to give your site – or your client’s site – a leg up in search?

At Brighton SEO last Friday, master of local SEO Greg Grifford shared some “righteous” tips for a kickass link-building strategy, in his signature flurry of slides and movie references – this time to 80s movies.

How link-building differs in local SEO

With local small businesses, said Gifford, you have to think about links in something other than pure numbers. Which is not to say that quantity doesn’t help – but it’s about the number of different sites which link to you, not the sheer number of links you have full stop.

With local SEO, all local links are relevant if they’re in the same geographical area as you. Even those crappy little church or youth group websites with a site design from the 1990s? Yes, especially those – in the world of local SEO, local relevance supersedes quality. While a link from a low-quality, low-authority website is a bad idea in all other contexts, local SEO is the one time that you can get away with it; in fact, these websites are your secret weapon.

Gifford also explained that local links are hard to reverse-engineer. If your competitors don’t understand local, they won’t see the value of these links – and even if they do, good relationships will allow you to score links that your competitors might not be able to get.

“It’s all about real-world relationships,” he said.

And once you have these relationships in place, you can get a ton of local links for less time and effort than it would take you to get a single link from a site with high domain authority.

So how should you go about building local relationships to get links? Gifford explained that there are five main ways to gain local links back to your business:

  1. Get local sponsorships
  2. Donate time or volunteer
  3. Get involved in your local community
  4. Share truly useful information
  5. Be creative in the hopes of scoring a random mention

Practical ways to get local links

These five basic ways of getting local links encompass dozens of different methods that you can use to build relationships and improve your standing in local search.

Here is just a sample of the huge list of ideas that Gifford ran through in his presentation:

Local meetups

Go to meetup.com and scout around for local meetups. A lot of local meetups don’t have a permanent location, which gives you an opportunity to offer your business as a permanent meeting venue. Or you can sponsor the event, make a small investment to buy food and drink for its members, and get a killer local link in return.

Local directories

Find local directories that are relevant to the business you’re working with. Gifford emphasized that these should not be huge, generic directories with names like “xyzdirectory.com”, but genuine local listings where you can provide useful information.

Local review sites

These are easier to get onto than bigger review websites, and with huge amounts of hyperlocal relevance.

Event sponsorships

Similar to sponsoring a local meetup, a relatively small investment can get you a great link in return. Event sponsorships will normally include your logo, but make sure that they also link back to your site.

Local blogs & newspapers

Local bloggers are hungry to find information to put on their blogs; you can donate time and information to them, and get a killer blog post and link out of the equation. The same is true of local newspapers, who are often stretched for content for their digital editions and might appreciate a tip or feature opportunity about a locally relevant business.

Local charities

Local charities are another way to get involved with the community and give back to it – plus, it’s great for your image. By the same token, you also can donate to local food banks or shelters, and be listed as a donor or sponsor on their website.

Local business associations

Much like local directories, it’s very easy to get listed by a local business association, such as a local bar dealer’s association – make sure there’s a link.

Local schools

These are great if you’re on the Board of Directors, or if your child or your client’s child is at that school. Again, getting involved in a local school is a good way to give back to the community at the same time as raising your local profile and improving your local links (both the SEO and the relationship kind).

Ethnic business directories

If you’re a member of a particular ethnic community who runs a local business, you can list your business on an ethnic business directory, which is great for grabbing the attention – and custom – of everyone in that community.

Of course, it goes without saying that you should only do this if it genuinely does apply to your business.

Gifford’s presentation contained even more ingenious ideas for local links than I’ve listed here, including local guides, art festivals and calendar pages; you can find the full list on his Slideshare of the presentation.

Gifford advises creating a spreadsheet with all your link opportunities, including what it will cost or the time it will take you. Make sure you have all of the relevant contact details, so that when it comes time to get the link, you can just go and get it. Then present that to your client, or if you’re not working on behalf of a client, to whichever individual whose buy-in you need in order to pursue a link-building strategy.

In fact, Gifford has even put together a pre-made spreadsheet ready for you to fill in, and you can download it here: bit.ly/badass-link-worksheet

Decide what links to go after, and go and get them; then, after three months, wipe the spreadsheet and repeat the process.

Some important points to bear in mind

So, now you’re all set to go out and gather a cornucopia of local links, all pointing right at your business, right? Well, here are a few points to bear in mind first.

A lot of times, the people you approach won’t know what SEO is, or even what digital is. So be careful about how you go about asking for a link; don’t mention links or SEO right off the bat. Instead, focus on the value that will be added for their customers. “This is not about the link; this is about the value that you can provide,” said Gifford.

Once again, for the people at the back: it’s about building up long-term, valuable relationships which provide benefit to you and to the local community. When it comes to local SEO, these relationships and the links that you can get will be worth more than any links from big, hefty high-domain-authority (but locally irrelevant) websites.

Or in Gifford’s words: “Forget about the big PR link shit. Go really hard after small, local links.”

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